22 January 2018

Digital Citizenship Article

        In the article “Developing Digital Citizens” by Venessa Monterosa the author gives tips to help start a conversation in a district about what steps to take in order to incorporate digital citizenship.
In 2013 the United States’ second largest school district, Los Angeles Unified School District launched a Digital Citizenship Week. One of the elementary schools in the district kicked off the event. The district felt like the event was a success, but wanted to find a way to get everyone in the district across grade levels talking about digital citizenship.
The article provides tips to teachers and districts on how to develop more awareness of being a good digital citizenship. According to the article, 90% of teenagers from 12-17 use some type of social media daily. Because of this, students beginning early on need to learn about what type of digital footprint they leave every time they are on social media. The author also reiterates numerous times that colleges now use social media as a recruiting and filtering technique as they admit new students.
Creating a district-wide digital citizenship curriculum should involve many parts, just as instituting any curriculum would. Some tips to help start that process are:
-      Put together a diverse team: involve teachers, administration, and students because they all provide a different view
-      Define social media terms: for instance the difference between social media and social networking
-      Identify key social media topics and content: what are the most important topics to cover?
-      Create a partnership: Involve Common Sense Education or other online community as well as community members.
-      Connect with a variety of stakeholders: schools can showcase what they know to the community
-      Establish a digital citizenship week: helps emphasize the important of being good citizens.
Students need to be prepared for the 21st century and part of that is learning how to be a good digital citizen. Talks about adding it into the daily curriculum may seem time consuming or unnecessary, but it is in today’s society.

Monterosa, V. (2015). Developing digital citizens. Leadership, 44(3), 30.

19 July 2017

Article Review - Using Digital Assessments in the Classroom


The article “Emotions Experienced by Students Taking Online and Classroom Quizzes” discusses the advantages and disadvantages of giving students assessments online. It specifically addresses how a group of undergraduate students felt taking different types of assessments. First, the author mentions that there are many benefits to giving assessments online, especially the idea of students taking control of their own environment. In many situations students can control their own environment. There are many disadvantages though as well. Some people question how secure tests can be and if the technology is available (at school or home). As digital assessments have become increasingly popular more studies have been done, but there still is not a lot of information about the correlation between digital assessments and emotions. From studies that have been completed, the authors mentioned that “When educators first started using computers for testing, computer anxiety (anxiety produced from being unfamiliar with using a computer) had small effects on students’ performance, but these effects seem to have largely dissipated with a general increase in familiarity with using computers.” It seems in most studies there is not a large discrepancy between paper and digital, but more studies need to be done in order to best meet students’ needs.
This article was extremely interesting to me, especially because so many assessments are done online. In my classroom students cannot adjust their environment as much, because they are on desktops. I could, however, have the students use the math online component at home to take quizzes. Some students may not have the technology available at home and there could be parents or siblings helping those students. In the classroom though, like with PARCC, I feel like students do become anxious especially because of how much pressure is put on them and the things they hear. This is something that needs to be changed! Hopefully as students AND teachers become more familiar with online testing everyone will become more comfortable.

Stowell, J. R., Allan, W. D., & Teoro, S. M. (2012). Emotions Experienced by Students Taking Online and Classroom Quizzes. Journal Of Educational Computing Research, 47(1), 93-106.

Multimedia Lesson Plan - Online Assessment

Online Assessment for Multimedia Lesson Plan
Intended Audience
3rd Grade Students

Learning Objectives

  • The student will be able to describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events
  • The student will be able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
  • The student will be able to explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)
Rationale
In 3rd grade students have to be able to describe characters and how their points of view are different. They also have to be able to distinguish how their own point of view is different than that of the characters. I used the picture book Voices in the Park to help students understand this concept. There are 4 different characters that all see the same park in very different ways. First the class would have discussed point of view. Then listened to the book first, then read the real text together. After that the class would do a matching activity that was shown on the screencast. I chose Google Forms to setup a quiz that the students would take. There are 6 multiple choice questions. Then last question is a short answer question that I would grade later. The students would receive immediate feedback on the multiple choice section. The questions test both knowledge about point of view, and applying that knowledge to the story. This grade would be used in conjunction with the activity from the screencast.

18 July 2017

Multimedia Lesson Plan - Screencasting



Screencasting for Multimedia Lesson Plan





Intended Audience
3rd Grade Students

Learning Objectives

  • The student will be able to describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events
  • The student will be able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
  • The student will be able to explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)
Rationale
In 3rd grade students have to be able to describe characters and how their points of view are different. They also have to be able to distinguish how their own point of view is different than that of the characters. I used the picture book Voices in the Park to help students understand this concept. There are 4 different characters that all see the same park in very different ways. During the podcast students listened to the story. Then I would have read the book together with the students. The screencast is used as modeling for group work the students would do to show they can explain point of view. I modeled matching characters and setting, then modeled an example of filling in the chart. By doing this with the students they were able to see what I was doing, as well as heard my thinking. When they go to fill in the charts, they will be able to re-listen to what I was modeling and see what I did as an example. Using the screen casting, as well as interactive features of Explain Everything will be a huge help in the classroom.